TREE SERVICES FOR ACADIA & MOUNT DESERT ISLAND, MAINE

maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
maine tree care
 
forest management and tree removal pruning powerline tree clearing and hazardous tree removals

Forest Management &
Tree Removal

Pruning for
Health, Vistas, Safety

Powerline Clearance &
Hazardous Removals

 

Savage Forest Enterprise specializes in complete tree and forest care in the greater Mount Desert Island, Maine area. We are fully insured, and our arborists are licensed by the State of Maine as required by law and certified by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).

 

We offer a range of services including long-term tree care, hazardous tree removals, powerline clearance, pruning and other comprehensive services.

From the Friends of Acadia Journal, Summer 2013

pruning

Preserving Our Island Relationships
by Tom Savage

While organizing my thoughts about why I'm a Friend of Acadia, I found myself drawn toward the philosophy that a local resident will find success in balancing a business with the beauty of Acadia The preservation of Acadia can blossom entrepreneurial avenues, and embracing the preservation can be a cornerstone in the long-term health of the residential and business community. My mindset was developed as an adolescent and grew into a lifestyle as an adult.

 

My Acadia connection is that of a local with descendants that go back to the late 1700s. My earliest ancestors settled on the same land that I now live on and made a living as many of us do today, by capitalizing on the popularity and beauty of Mount Desert Island. My great-great-grandfather recognized the economic potential when developing the Asticou Inn at the head of Northeast Harbor. Later generations would feel the instability of such endeavors as tourism dropped in the 1950s and 60s, leading to the inevitable loss of the Inn. However, financial loss gave rise to beauty My great-uncle, who had lost the Inn, designed the Azalea and Thuya Gardens. It was a creation that blended tourism with the natural beauty of Acadia and continued a family history of balancing nature and economics.

 

This rich, living history was not lost in me growing up in Northeast Harbor. I lived across from the formerly family-owned Inn and our house bordered the Azalea Garden. Our neighborhood was filled with relatives- aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents. With all of them a stone's throw away, everyday life was filled with building blocks for the future. As an adolescent, I watched family members make the most of the opportunities that arose from this popular and beautiful place. It was more than enacting philosophical ideals; it was a means to financial survival. I grew up in a family of teachers, with both grandparents being educators as well as an aunt, uncle, mother, and father all teaching in the local schools. With the influx of residents during the summer months, these salaries would be supplemented by working in the tourism industry My father ran a fuel delivery business from our back yard-a business that had originated with his father-while running a boat charter business from the local marina in Northeast Harbor. My mother tutored a summer family's children and my sister was on the infamous "Animal Cracker" babysitter list before her days as a deck hand on local schooners. My grandfather, great-uncle, and aunt all drove in the family taxi business, and everyone took advantage of an empty room or house by renting to visitors.

 

I, on the other hand, being the youngest of six cousins in the neighborhood, got off lucky in the summers of my youth. I'd start my day pestering the Azalea Garden workers as I used the walking paths as a bike course, and then I'd grab my fishing pole and explored the brooks and streams that poured from Acadia. As my curiosity grew, I would find myself at Upper Hadlock Pond, Harbor Brook, Thuya Garden, and even an occasional walk to Jordan Pond on those daily fishing trips. In the evenings, I would walk up to my aunt and uncle's stables where riding classes were ending. With a little more pestering and a lot of manure shoveling, I sometimes got up in the saddle for a trot with my cousins on the carriage roads.

 

It was a blessed childhood, to live within Acadia. I understood that hard work and balancing the opportunities that Acadia and the surrounding communities provided were the key to enjoying life on MDI. My Friendship was founded in those childhood years and was developed through an entrepreneurial spirit after college. I was determined to work and live here, and I believe that embracing all aspects of the Island is the key It's my hope that my involvement in Friends of Acadia enlightens those of that coexistence. I'm a Friend because I feel it's an obligation as a parent, business owner, descendent, and community member to support the preservation of the Island's residential and business communities and Acadia National Park all as one being.